Millers Falls Publications — 1961-1981

1961

Millers Falls Company hand, prescision tool catalog, 1961

Small format catalog. Title from cover. Date is inferred from cover numbering (H-161C) as number H-162C was published in 1962.


1962

Millers Falls Company hand, prescision tool catalog, 1962

Large format catalog. Title from cover. Twenty pages shorter than its predecessor.


Millers Falls Company hand, prescision tool catalog, small format, 1962

Small format catalog. Title from cover. Cover and pagination identical to large format catalog. This example was once owned by the Screw Products Corporation.


1963

Millers Falls Company 17 new tools promotion

A trade circular that introduces, among others, six new hatchets, a new series of tenite-handled screwdrivers and the no. 3040 chisel set.


Millers Falls Company 17 new tools promotion

A football-themed trade circular that introduces five new electric tools and eight new hand tools including a Dyna-Grip screwdriver set, shears, crosscut saws, snips, hex wrench sets and a checked-face framing hammer. Also features promotional prices on a number of other items in the line.


Millers Falls Company distributor's pack

Shown here is a distributor's pack either made up by or for S. L. McKenzie, jr., of the Dallas district office. His business card is clipped inside and bears the handwritten notation "8/20/63". The soft black cover contains current catalogs, distributor price lists and promotional items which have been pre-punched for use in a five-ring binder. Some of the contents of the binder pertaining to hand tools have been included as individual items on this list.


1964

Millers Falls Company hand, precision tools catalog, 1964

Both the traditional triangular and the new square trademarks can be seen on the cover. Gentleman on cover bears a striking resemblance to Ward Cleaver, the father figure on the Leave it to Beaver television series that ran until 1963.


Millers Falls Company price list, 1964

Title from cover. Contains "List prices applying to: H64-Z Hand and precision tool catalogs and all supplemental catalogs, pages and inserts." Uncoated blue paper.


1965

Millers Falls Company hand, precision tools catalog, 1965

Except for the catalog number, the cover is identical to that of the 1964 catalog. The catalog includes seven pages of wrenches, sockets, and pliers not seen in the 1964 catalog. The new tools were likely manufactured by the Pendleton Tool Company, the other major hand tool manufacturer in the Ingersoll-Rand Company stable.


How to Build and Improve Your Home Workshop booklet, 1965

Contains plans for a simple bench, tool board, and supply cabinet. The company hired popular woodworking writer John G. Shea to develop plans for the pegboard-and-plywood projects and anticipated customers would be willing to pay ten cents for the information. Five of the eleven pages consist of ads for Millers Falls tools.


1967

Millers Falls Company hand tool catalog, 1967

Title from cover. The size and nice layout of the catalog obscure the fact that the product line is shrinking.


1969

Millers Falls Company hand tools catalog, 1969

Title from cover. A undated catalog, but assuredly 1969. Reflective of the changes taking place in the hardware trade at this time. Many smaller items are now sold carded—i.e., on shrink-wrapped cardboard, pre-punched for hanging on a pegboard hook. Introduces the No. 9140, 9775 and 9790 teflon-coated planes.


1971

Millers Falls Company distributor price list, 1971

Title from cover. A combination price list and catalog covering a much-reduced line of Millers Falls hand tools. Once an industry leader in hand-powered boring tools, the company now offers 8 braces, 4 eggbeater drills, 2 push drills and a lone breast drill. Cover design is a rework of the previous catalog. At first glance, the cover is very similar to that of 1969, but it does, in fact, include a few line drawings not included on the 1969 cover.


Millers Falls Company catalog, 1971

Title from cover. A comprehensive catalog of the company's products, its hand tool section is, for the most part, a reprint of Hand Tools: Confidential Distributor Price List Effective May 1, 1971. Includes net, resale and list prices.


1972

Millers Falls Company catalog, 1971

Title from cover. A comprehensive catalog of the company's products. The pages featuring hand tool merchandising display so longer appear. Pages are similar to those of the 1972 catalog, with blank areas replacing the text and images for tools that have been cut.


1973

Millers Falls Company catalog, 1973

Title from cover. Catalog is not dated. Date determined by comparing contents against dated price lists. The catalog lists fewer saw blades and power tool accessories than the previous edition. There are fewer cuts to the hand tool section. Does not include prices.


1974

Millers Falls tool buyers guide, 1974

Title from cover. The Tool Group was the umbrella name for the Ingersoll-Rand hand tool companies—Union Tool, Proto, Challenger and Millers Falls. This buyer's guide is basically a Millers Falls catalog with fourteen pages of Union Tool precision tools appended. No prices.


Millers Falls re-distributor price list, 1974

Title from cover. Uncoated blue paper. Redistributor and list prices for Millers Falls hand tools and Union Tool precision tools for the 1975 year.


1975

Millers Falls tools catalog cover, 1975 Millers Falls tools catalog back cover, 1975

Title from cover. Wonderful cover art makes this catalog a classic period piece. Inspired by the "hippie" style of the late 1960s and early 1970s, the front and rear covers depict such fantasies as a hacksaw cutting the top off a mountain, a tape measure that turns into a driveway, a router cutting a canal, and a combination-square bridge. The illustration is simply signed "Fisher" and attempts at further identifying the artist have come to naught. Former company president Jim Mitchell remembers staff in the Millers Falls office referring to the publication as the "Mickey Mouse catalog."


1976

Millers Falls hand tools catalog, 1976

Title from cover. The Tool Group concept was abandoned in 1976. The Millers Company is now referred to as the Millers Falls Division of the Ingersoll-Rand Company. Amazingly, at this late date, the catalog still includes listings for three miter boxes. Jim Mitchell, company president at the time, recalls that the operation's miter boxes were among the most profitable of its hand-powered tools.


Millers Falls distributor price list, 1976

Title from cover. Uncoated yellow paper. Wholesaler/industrial distributor net, resale and user prices for Millers Falls tools.


1977

Millers Falls Company builders hand tools catalog, 1977

Title from cover. No electrical tools are included. This is the first of several catalogs that have virtually identical covers. Interestingly, the catalog includes a new hand drill, the No. 506121.


1978

Millers Falls Company builders hand tools catalog, 1978

An easily missed variant. Title from cover. At first glance appears identical to its predecessor but can identified by the notation 'Edition 3' on the right hand corner of the cover. By this time, most of the Millers Falls line of hand-powered tools were manufactured elsewhere and branded with the company name. Is five pages longer than the 1977 edition.


1979

Millers Falls Company builders hand tools catalog, 1979

An easily missed variant. Title from cover. At first glance appears identical to is predecessor. It contains 12 fewer pages, however, and can be identified by the notation 'Edition 4' on the right hand corner of the cover. A number of tools have been eliminated; few tools are identified as 'new'. Notable among these is a new bit brace,the No. 1910 (no relationship to the company's earlier 1910 M-S). Published after company headquarters were moved from Greenfield to South Deerfield, the catalog was the last produced during company president Jim Mitchell's tenure.


1981

Millers Falls Company hand tools catalog, 1981

Title from cover. By this time, the much reduced Millers Falls line of hand tools included 2 miter boxes, a hand drill, a breast drill, six braces, and six hand planes. Interestingly, a version of the so-called Buck Rogers hacksaw was still in production. The venerable No. 2 hand drill, renumbered the No. 2-01, is still offered (over a century after its  introduction). Two block planes dating to the time of the company's introduction of hand planes in 1929 remained available—a much-altered No. 56 and the No. 75 (renumbered 75-01).