Bench Plane Model Number Chart

Numbering system

Millers Falls bench plane The firm offered a line of Bailey-type bench planes that competed model for model with those of Stanley—with one major exception. An equivalent to the Stanley No. 1 was never sold. To identify the sizes of its premium bench planes, the company used a numbering system based on the length of the sole. For those familiar with Stanley numbering, it may be difficult to visualize a plane on the basis of this number, so a conversion chart is provided below. The earliest planes were identified by a size number cast into the bed. Later models were stamped with the manufacturer’s name and model number near the sole on what would be the left cheek of the plane as it is viewed from the rear. Models with corrugated bottoms are typically stamped with the letter ‘C’ following the model number.

The ‘B’ numbers

Sometime in the latter 1960s, Millers Falls began making changes to the numbers on its planes. Neither the reason for—nor the timing of—the changes is clear. The company began appending letters to the model numbers stamped on some of its products, a change typically not reflected in its catalogs.  When reading the table below, the ‘B’ numbers are not considered new models. Examples of variant numbers include: 9B, 14B, 14-01-B, 22CB. These numbers would be interpreted: 9, 14, 14-01, 22C. Most of the b-numbered planes are characterized by knobs and handles attached to the bed by Phillips-head, rather than slotted screws.

The ‘G’ numbers

When Millers Falls began making changes to the marking on its planes, it sometimes added the letter ‘G’ to the model number. A number of planes bearing G markings have been found in boxes with labels indicating that they were supplied under contract to the United States government. Although the G designation was used to mark planes manufactured for federal use, practice was inconsistent, and not all planes sold to the government are so marked. When reading the the table below, the G numbers are not considered new models. Examples of variant numbers include: 22CGB, 90CGB. These numbers would be interpreted: 22C, 90C.

Model Stanley Equiv. Length Width Start Date End Date
No. 7 No. 2 7 in.* 1 5/8 in. 1929 1944
No. 8 No. 3 8 in. ** 1 3/4 in. 1929 1971
No. 8C No. 3C 8 in. 1 3/4 in. 1929 1969
No. 8-03 No. 3C 8 in. 1 3/4 in. 1969 1971
No. 9 No. 4 9 in. 2 in. 1929 1976
No. 9C No. 4C 9 in. 2 in. 1929 1969
No. 9-02 No. 4C 9 in. 2 in. 1969 1971
No. 10 No. 4 1/2 10 in. 2 3/8 in. 1929 1961
No. 10C No. 4 1/2C 10 in. 2 3/8 in. 1929 1961
No. 11 No. 5 1/4 11 in. 1 3/4 in. 1929 1970
No. 14 No. 5 14 in. 2 in. 1929 1978
No. 14C No. 5C 14 in. 2 in. 1929 1969
No. 14-01 No. 5C 14 in. 2 in. 1969 1971
No. 15 No. 5 1/2 15 in. 2 1/4 in. 1929 1961
No. 15C No. 5 1/2C 15 in. 2 1/4 in. 1929 1961
No. 18 No. 6 18 in. 2 3/8 in. 1929 1971
No. 18C No. 6C 18 in. 2 3/8 in. 1929 1967
No. 22 No. 7 22 in. 2 3/8 in. 1929 1967
No. 22C No. 7C 22 in. 2 3/8 in. 1929 1967
No. 24 No. 8 24 in. 2 5/8 in. 1929 1961
No. 24C No. 8C 24 in. 2 5/8 in. 1929 1961
No. 90 No. 1204 9 in. 2 in. by 1959 1969
No. 90C none 9 in. 2 in. ca. 1964 ca. 1969
No. 90-01 none, corrugated 9 in. 2 in. ca. 1969 ca. 1971
No. 140 No. 1205 14 in. 2 in. by 1959 1969
No. 140C none 14 in. 2 in. ca. 1964 1969
No. 209 none 9 in. 2 in. 1937 1947
No. 709 none 9 in. 2 in. 1949 1960
No. 714 none 14 in. 2 in. 1949 1960
No. 814 No. H1205 14 in. 2 in. 1935 1974
No. 900 No. H1204 9 in. 2 in. 1935 1974
No. 8900 No. H1204 9 in. 2 in. 1974 after 1984
No. 9140 none, teflon coated 14 in. 2 in. 1969 1971
No. 9790 none, teflon coated 9 in. 2 in. 1969 1971
No. 9814 No. H1205 14 in. 2 in. 1974 after 1984

* The No. 7 is an exception to the company’s numbering system. Although Millers Falls catalog copy states that the plane is seven inches long and although the Stanley no. 2 which the plane mimics is seven inches long, the Millers Falls No. 7 is slightly in excess of eight inches in length.

** The No. 8 is another exception to the company’s numbering system. Although Millers Falls catalog copy states that the plane is eight inches long, the Millers Falls No. 8 is nine inches long—as is the Stanley no. 3, which the plane mimics.